You experienced in a recent accident while navigating California’s roads. You were not at fault, but your vehicle sustained damage in the collision. Thankfully, the other driver has insurance, but you have never filed a claim on another’s policy.

Forbes offers insights into making an insurance claim on the at-fault driver’s policy. Learn how to boost your chances of receiving compensation for your resulting motor vehicle accident expenses.

Filing a third-party claim

When you go through another’s liability insurance policy to cover damages, you make a third-party claim. Even if the insurer honors the claim, you may have to submit to a claims adjuster examining your vehicle and your injuries before receiving a settlement. Third-party claims investigations also allow insurance providers the chance to determine which party bears fault for the incident.

Using your own insurance

If the other person’s insurance company gives you the runaround or you disagree with the claim amount, you may want to file a claim through your auto coverage policy. Another reason to use your own policy is that the other driver does not have adequate insurance coverage to satisfy the full extent of your car repair and medical bills. Your current policy may account for uninsured or underinsured drivers. Underinsured coverage helps make up the difference between any expenses that the responsible party’s policy does not cover. Alternatively, uninsured motorist policies help keep you from paying for another’s negligence.

Suing the other driver

What if you do not have under/uninsured driver coverage? You can sue the other person to receive compensation. Even then, you have no guarantee that the other party has the assets to cover the settlement amount.